Evaluating the Kidney-Chip for Transporter-Mediated Drug-Drug Interactions Applications

Webinar Overview

In this on-demand webinar, Covance and Emulate present promising new data on the characterization of the Kidney-Chip as a model to study and predict potential drug-drug interactions.

In the pharmaceutical industry, there is a need for more human-relevant preclinical models that can enable a mechanistic understanding of human diseases and drug action. 

Organ-Chips can help address this need by recreating in vivo-relevant function and key disease phenotypes in a more physiological microenvironment than conventional cell-based models. Covance and Emulate are collaborating to evaluate the Proximal Tubule Kidney-Chip to study transporter-mediated DDIs to fill the gap between current in vitro options and clinical trials.

In this webinar, scientists from Emulate and Covance showcase promising new data on characterization of the Kidney-Chip as a model to study and predict potential drug-drug interactions.


Featured Presenters

Steve Anderson, PhD
CSO, Covance

Steve outlines the need for more human-relevant cell-based systems to improve translation of preclinical data to the clinic and get safer, more efficacious therapeutics to patients.

Kyung-Jin (KJ) Jang, PhD
VP of Technology Implementation & Field Science, Emulate

KJ highlights the Human Emulation System, an Organs-on-Chips platform that recreates the required microenvironment to enable physiologically relevant function in a human cell-based system, as a new solution to study and predict transporter-mediated DDIs.

Donald McKenzie, PhD
Global Business Lead for Drug Metabolism & Lead Optimization, Covance

Donald presents proof-of-concept data to characterize the Proximal Tubule Kidney-Chip including efflux activities using probe substrates such as digoxin mediated by P-gp; tetraethylammonium and metformin mediated collaboratively by OCT1/2, MATE1, and MATE2-K; and para aminohippuric acid mediated by OAT1/3. The data also includes functional modulation of efflux by known inhibitors of specific transporters.