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Organs-on-Chips Technology

March 28, 2017

By Matthew Corcoran Associate Director, Content
By Matthew Corcoran Associate Director, Content

Organs-on-Chips Technology

March 28, 2017

Organ-Chips are a window into human biology. They allow us to see and analyze biological processes that can’t be viewed any other way.

  • Working with our community of research collaborators, we are creating a series of new views of human biology, some of which you’ll see below.
  • Our current chips include the Brain, Liver, Lung, and Intestine. And we are working on Skin, Muscle, Heart, Kidney, and Eye chips.
  • One Chip = One Animal. We want to help reduce, refine, and replace animal testing with a new human-relevant system.
  • In the future, our platform could be used for personalized healthcare. By putting your cells on a chip, we could understand how different medicines, foods, and chemicals would affect you as an individual. It’s like studying yourself, outside yourself.

A Short Film about Our Work

Human Emulation System

New Views of Human Biology

Here are a few images of real living human biology from inside the Organ-Chips. More are being created each day.

Image:

Cilia inside the Lung-Chip.

Image:

Neuron inside the Brain-Chip.

Image:

Hepatocytes are one of the key kinds of liver cells. This photo shows them living inside Emulate's Liver-Chip.

Image:

Intestinal micro-villi inside the Intestine-Chip.

Image:

Lung tissue in the chip, showing the same characteristics and morphology as in the human lung.

Image:

Three-dimensional image of a blood clot (thrombi) inside the Lung-Chip.

Image:

Cilia inside the Lung-Chip.

Image:

Living neurons firing inside Emulate's Brain-Chip.

Image:

Bacteria (yellow) engulfed by white blood cell (blue) inside the Lung-Chip.

Image:

We can apply mechanical forces to our Organ-Chips, which makes the microenvironment even more like the human body. In this image, intestine cells experience peristalsis inside our Intestine-Chip.

Image:

Red blood cells flowing through an Emulate Organ-Chip.

Image:

Immune cells attaching to an inflamed endothelium, recreating the natural immune response that happens inside the lung.

Image:

Cilia clearing mucus inside the Lung-Chip.

Image:

Cilia beating inside Emulate's Lung-Chip.